Kakogawa (加古川市 Kakogawa-shi) is a city located in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. The city was founded on June 15, 1950.

As of September 1, 2016, the city has an estimated population of 266,433 and a population density of 1,923.98 persons per km². The total area is 138.51 km².

The city offers easy access to Himeji (about 10 mins), Kobe (about 30 mins) and Osaka (about 50 mins) by JR Line.

The city currently has a sister city relationship with Maringá, in Brazil, and Auckland, in New Zealand.

The Kansai region is a cultural center and the historical heart of Japan, with 11% of the nation's land area and 22,757,897 residents as of 2010. The Osaka Plain with the cities of Osaka and Kyoto forms the core of the region, from there the Kansai area stretches west along the Seto Inland Sea towards Kobe and Himeji and east encompassing Lake Biwa, Japan's largest freshwater lake. In the north, the region is bordered by the Sea of Japan, to the south by the Kii Peninsula and the Pacific Ocean, and to the east by the Ibuki Mountains and Ise Bay. Four of Japan's national parks lie within its borders, in whole or in part. The area also contains six of the seven top prefectures in terms of national treasures. Other geographical features include Amanohashidate in Kyoto Prefecture and Awaji Island in Hyōgo.

The Kansai region is often compared with the Kantō region, which lies to its east and consists primarily of Tokyo and the surrounding area. Whereas the Kantō region is symbolic of standardization throughout Japan, the Kansai region displays many more idiosyncrasies – the culture in Kyoto, the mercantilism of Osaka, the history of Nara, or the cosmopolitanism of Kobe – and represents the focus of counterculture in Japan. This East-West rivalry has deep historical roots, particularly from the Edo period. With a samurai population of less than 1% the culture of the merchant city of Osaka stood in sharp contrast to that of Edo, the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate.

The Heian period saw the capital moved to Heian-kyō (平安京, present-day Kyoto), where it would remain for over a thousand years until the Meiji Restoration. During this golden age, the Kansai region would give birth to traditional Japanese culture. In 788, Saicho, the founder of the Tendai sect of Buddhism established his monastery at Mount Hiei in Shiga prefecture. Japan's most famous tale, and some say the world's first novel, The Tale of Genji was penned by Murasaki Shikibu while performing as a lady-in-waiting in Heian-kyo. Noh and Kabuki, Japan's traditional dramatic forms both saw their birth and evolution in Kyoto, while Bunraku, Japanese puppet theater, is native to Osaka.

Kansai's unique position in Japanese history, plus the lack of damage from wars or natural disasters has resulted in Kansai region having more UNESCO World Heritage Listings than any other region of Japan. The five World Heritage Listings include: Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area, Himeji Castle, Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities), Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara, and Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range.

Tighter definitions for Greater Tokyo do not include adjacent metropolitan areas of Numazu-Mishima (approx. 450,000) to the southwest, Maebashi-Takasaki-Ōta-Ashikaga (approx. 1,500,000 people) on the northwest, and Greater Utsunomiya (ja:宇都宮都市圏) approx. 1,000,000) to the north. If they are included, Greater Tokyo's population would be around 39 million.

At the centre of the main urban area (approximately the first 10 km from Tokyo Station) are the 23 special wards, formerly treated as a single city but now governed as separate municipalities, and containing many major commercial centres such as Shinjuku, Shibuya, Ikebukuro and Ginza. Around the 23 special wards are a multitude of suburban cities which merge seamlessly into each other to form a continuous built up area, circumnavigated by the heavily travelled Route 16 which forms a (broken) loop about 40 km from central Tokyo. Situated along the loop are the major cities of Yokohama (to the south of Tokyo), Hachiōji (to the west), Ōmiya (now part of Saitama City, to the north), and Chiba (to the east). Within the Route 16 loop, the coastline of Tokyo Bay is heavily industrialised, with the Keihin Industrial Area stretching from Tokyo down to Yokohama, and the Keiyō Industrial Zone from Tokyo eastwards to Chiba. Along the periphery of the main urban area are numerous new suburban housing developments such as the Tama New Town. The landscape is relatively flat compared to most of Japan, most of it comprising low hills.

Outside the Route 16 loop the landscape becomes more rural. To the southwest is an area known as Shōnan, which contains various cities and towns along the coast of Sagami Bay, and to the west the area is mountainous.

Many rivers run through the area, the major ones being Arakawa and Tama River.

k r o 8 u 6 z g h c o u z e x t d h h o u l o u t h n k h l h h r u c u j c a c d b r h o b d s 22 13 h j s s h g o u i 24 n s r h s r n l r d 23 o x k x d s e e j r l i 23 14 u z 15 d v r a x 20 t o o 10 22 23 h j a s 18 d v 27 u e d 12 i o 21 18 m r z h o d o o o y k d e s 12 t i i s 25 x h h y k g c s s 13 m d a 15 u h k 19 h s s 20 d t 25 o o j y 13 x l g b s d u j a k a h d u s e r v d d 9 i h y 10 v l o 8 y h x y 22 m k s 16 h 9 h 10 u e d u u d b s o 20 i a b k 11 j l 19 13 19 e g 14 x i n n r t 23 t h h n o 26 s s o 24 r c x 18 10 m j 4 y g r 13 i r 21 14 g n t l d h h s h r a h r k j s u m z a y k 20 21 y l y k s r s k d s o u 21 y s i d b 20 x s h r 25 a o z a 8 m o s r o i g i u u k c i h k l 15 i h 14 20 i 21 6 g k n k i k k s g g h v 17 h h 7 u j u k y a o h 10 s c g 16 8 21 23 e s 23 h t 7 a d i o y a h n d j o s k o 24 11 10 g a u 19 i u c o 25 y v 16 u r y s 11 18 18 k k x s b j h z y j v o o i j d r m m 16 r b o n x 16 b h 22 h r a s m 9 u s y o g 14 k u 9 21 r x i u s s m a y s 9 c e y u g j d o v m g m y 18 r j i s e s s 19 x m 19 h s i 21 17 d u v z e d y c o 12 a i s i y y a v l k 15 s t j g v 9 a o x u d e t g u h a g s g o j d n v x b o 12 17 15 h d u 26 h h h n u g j a c i k d m s k u u j s a u s 24 s d u d 16 j l d r d b r r c o y 14 s 25 25 d h u d m k h 20 j o j c 18 a n d d s g n z a b z d 10 5 e 7 z y z s r u d 27 u 26 24 y 22 h a i e h s k j g 11 j r y j 15 d e r h n n y a t 11 d g h z o s 22 l s 5 s j b c u s s b 17 10 12 z l y h s z g 11 13 n d b c a h r y y k s o y u s u o 9 s h d 23 o s i u h 26 v u r 17 h k 12 r k h 17 m a k 22 o g s x b j d d j u a o k v d r d 17 g r o r a s g h r k h j e a s j s d 17 i 9 7 t o u u o h y g o 24 z 27 u d j m u r 12 h u 16 d d g y c l i o 12 a t z u a 13 j n 13 t h u i 18 s b y l i h a j g 15 h i t j v g i k b y o g d 11 i 23 s 22 h c k g i d y h h v j e s g h a y o i o u c x v v 20 s 8 d 6 r h t h h 16 o s n g v g d l 14 x o e g 15 g z 24 h a u h t j 11 t h z b u s a s 14 m a 19 t s i c s m g s u j l h 19 n e u z k s s h x a h y v o h l y d i b j d